As the UX designer for Microsoft Israel’s Next group, I planed and designed on{X}.
on{X} (pronounced like 'on-ex') let users automate their Android phones, using a set of triggers and actions provided by our group.

Goals

On{x} was part of a bigger strategy and thinking within MS about search, mobile context (our phones are always on, we know a person’s location and activity), and A.I. assistants.
We wanted to give users the tools to fully control their Android devices and explore automation scenarios, thus providing us with valuable data about user needs. These findings helped define some of Microsoft’s A.I. assistant, Cortana.

Defining the project

With the purpose of helping find the right balance of content, creation and tone of voice, I explored Dev tools and communities, as well as existing automation tools.

 
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Decisions

  • Target audience
    Primary: The open source community, it’s professional as well as amateur developers.
    Secondary: Early adopters who follow technical blogs and news outlets, immersed in the startup world.

  • Build a community around on{X}
    A place for developers to give and receive feedback. A place where they can help and interact with like minded people, as well as with the team.

  • Optimize top of funnel
    We could optimize the top of our funnel by providing users with pre-built rules they can send to their phone with a click, before actually needing to dive into the code. They’ll need to sign in to send the recipe to their phone, or view the code.

 
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The console

When the users choose a recipe, they could click on the Code button to view the code. They can play with the code, modify it and build on top of it, or - create a code from scratch using the documentation links offered on the right side.
The console was built to open on top of the recipe. Slick, clean, the design and UI was guided with help from the developers on the MS team.

 
 
  Developer console

Developer console

 
 

Building the community

Every signed in user saw the communities’ top discussions in their homepages. If they haven’t downloaded the on{X} app, we showed them a banner prompting them to download it.

 
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Metrics & feedback

 

On{X} was received enthusiastically by the open source community. There were numerous articles in publications such as TechCrunch, 93,157 app installs in the following month
75% of users used the pre-built rules as is, 16% modified the recipes code, and there were 9% who created entirely new use cases with the code provided in our documentation.

 
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